Water - Can you drink it in Tasmania's National Parks?

Few places on Earth have water as pristine as in the Tasmanian wilderness.

These few words made me feel like getting on a plane and heading down to Tasmania for a long cool drink....
The top of Hartnett Falls - check out how clear the water is....

Regular readers of "Our Hiking Blog" will remember a post about the Great Ocean Walk and the availability of drinking water . We argued that Park's Victoria was being too risk adverse in the advice it was giving people who were planning the walk. Today we came across this information
provided by the Tasmanian Parks and Wildlife Service about drinking water in the Frenchman's Cap area. We would assume this advice is sound for most areas in Tasmania's National Parks.

Water
Few places on Earth have water as pristine as in the Tasmanian wilderness. Of course, the water within our national parks is not treated. It may therefore not meet the National Health and Medical Research Council's Guidelines for drinking water. The Tasmanian Department of Health and Human Services thus advises that as a precautionary measure, untreated water should be boiled (1-3 minutes) before drinking or being used for food preparation. Other forms of water treatment (iodine, water filters) may also be used.

Take special care to keep water supplies clean, particularly around the huts. Always wash 50m away from streams and lakes, and do not use soaps and detergents. Don't throw food scraps into streams or lakes. Both huts have tanks for collection of rainwater.

Great, simple information. Identifies the risk, clarifies peoples' thinking and suggests ways to avoid any issues. Well done Parks! Good sensible information.

2 comments:

Ken said...

Quite often the problem is the lack of identification of whether it is a known or unknown problem. I have seen taps simply labelled "Do not drink". Is this because it has possible bacterial, and can be boiled or it has chemical contamination and will never be safe or there is only enough water for handwashing ? NSW national parks puts a warning sign on any water they haven't tested.

Frank and Sue said...

Hi Ken,
Thanks for the comment. I agree, NOT KNOWING is the problem. AMaybe there should be a national standard for labelling......